Wednesday, 30 September 2015
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{RECIPE} Easy Peanut Butter Dog Biscuits

This is a very easy recipe for anyone looking for a special homemade dog treat idea.  It's quick, simple, and hard to mess up. It's a great one for cooking with children to make a special treat for their best furry friend. They can even taste test the treats together after baking! They do smell really good...  The cooling rack was well guarded - check out my handsome (albeit slightly drooly) sous-chef in the last picture below!  These soft cookie style treats are doggone delicious, but not so yummy to us humans who are used to sweeter (naughtier) human treats. 

Homemade peanut butter cookie dog treats

Easy Three Ingredient Peanut Butter Dog Biscuits


🥄 Treat Ingredients:

1/3 cup smooth peanut butter
1 egg
1/2 cup coconut flour
 
🥄 Making the Treats: 

Preheat your oven to 180C (or local equivalent) and gather together your baking ingredients and materials. 

Mix all of the ingredients thoroughly to form a cohesive dough (adjust consistency with a little extra flour or water if needed).  Hand roll into small bite-sized balls, place on a prepared baking sheet, and flatten gently.  Use a fork for flattening if you want a classic peanut butter cookie style cross-hatched top - simply press the tines gently twice, with the second press perpendicular to the first. Easy peasy!  Bake for approximately 10-15 minutes, then cool before serving and storage.


Tips and Tricks:
  • New to treat baking? Check out our introduction to making baked biscuit (cookie) dog treats for more information about baked biscuit/cookie style dog treats, including common ingredients, their role in baking, troubleshooting problems, and more.
  • Go natural or take care when shopping to avoid artificial sweeteners in ingredients like peanut butter for your dogs – xylitol (also identified as sweetener E967) is particularly dangerous for dogs.  If your chosen peanut butter is gluten free, then so are these treats. 
  • Coconut flour is a good option for gluten-free / grain-free pet treats, but it is also a pretty healthy choice outright: it is high in fibre, high in protein, and low-GI relative to alternatives. You can experiment with substitutes flours, but you might need to up the quantity and/or adjust other ingredients to get a good "playdough-like" cookie dough consistency as coconut flour is very absorbent.
  • Treats can be broken for smaller dogs, or made smaller - just keep an eye on your cooking time, as the smaller the cookie the shorter the baking time.
  • Homemade dog treats are best enjoyed within a few days of baking, but can be frozen if you would like to freeze extras or make a large batch for later. You can read more here about shelf-life and storage for homemade baked biscuit style dog treats.


Homemade peanut butter cookie dog treats on a polka dotted table

🦴 Hungry for more tasty treats?  You can explore from our treat navigation page, hop straight into our homemade dog treat ideas in the blog archives, search the blog from our sidebar, or use the labels below this post to find other recipes that might be of interest. Remember, treats (bought or homemade) are for spoiling your pup in moderation. We share ideas here from treats that we make ourselves for our pets, but different animals will have different preferences (likes/dislikes) and dietary needs. Some pets may have special dietary requirements and/or food allergies/intolerances. If you are ever in doubt or have questions about what's suitable for your pet, have a chat with your trusted vet.

Dalmatian dog smiling as homemade dog treats cool on kitchen counter nearby

16 comments:

  1. Can these be made to cut shapes instead?

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    1. Hi there! Because of the coconut flour and dough consistency, these are not well suited for rolling and cutting. The dough would be crumbly/crack. I find coconut flour tricky for shapes, so if you wanted to adapt the recipe I'd suggest swapping out some of the coconut flour for rice, buckwheat, or other flour of your choice (you will need more, as they are less absorbent) as well as adding water or other liquid (with more flour) so you have a a better dough hydration and consistency for rolling work. Not to worry though! We have tons of other treats including go-to basic smooth roll-and-cut peanut butter treat dough recipe. Hope that helps!

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    2. Anonymous: I use ground up oatmeal,Egg,Yogurt, Pbutter & Coconut oil To make furbaby treats & Am able to use a cookie cutter.. same temp & time..

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  2. R these treats suppose to be soft or crunchy

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    1. Hi there! These treats are rather soft - much like a non-crispy human cookie.

      Dog treat recipes are usually made without the snappy but unhealthy combo of sugar and fat that bakes up to give human cookies their crispy crunch. To make dog treats crunchier, they are usually baked long and low or (my preference) baked and dehydrated. Leaving the treats in the oven as it cools is one easy way to make things a bit crunchier, but you can also use your oven on low temp (fan forced is best to remove moisture) or a dehydrator. Our dehydrator is only a basic inexpensive model, but works great and is very handy.

      Dense cookie-style recipes like this one I usually leave as soft treats, but I often bake and dehydrate with thinner roll-and-cut style treats for extra snap. You can check out some of our other recipes for ideas, if you'd like! :)

      Hope that helps!

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  3. Can the dough be thinned out with liquid to make them less rich?

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    1. Hi there! You could indeed, although you will need to use more flour and this may be trick for consistency. I find coconut flour to be rather demanding in the binding department when baking, so if you want to thin things out to be less rich, you might like to experiment with using a combination of flours (such as part coconut, part brown rice or oat flour) and/or using something like pureed pumpkin, applesauce, or other ingredients that can both add moisture but help consistency. You might create an awesome new recipe in your experiments - in which case, please come back and share in the comments! :)

      If experimenting isn't your thing or you'd like some inspiration on ingredients and combos, we have tons of different treat recipes on the blog that you can browse through or search via keyword or ingredients.

      Good luck! Hope that helps!

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  4. How long i can store these one`s in mason jar ?

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    1. Hi there! Very sorry for the slow reply - we've been offline during a move. Our homemade dog treats don't contain any preservatives, so they are best treated like homemade human cookies and stored briefly in a sealed container at room temperate and/or frozen for longer storage.

      I like to freeze my treats for fresh defrosting in small quantities.

      Hot or humid ambient conditions will shorten shelf life. Similarly, drier treats will typically last a little longer at room temperature, so dehydrating a little in the oven after baking or in a dehydrator can not only help make thing a little crispier, but extend shelf life a bit as well.

      Hope that helps!

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  5. I made these cokies with almond flour as I didn't have coconut flour and organic sugar free peanut butter. Yhey have been a great hit with my little ones and my neighbor's little one that has diabetes. I guess you can use any type of natureal flour. I am also going to try it with brown rice flour!

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    1. Yay! Baking peanut butter treats with rice flour is actually one of our personal favourites. It's not as nutritionally dense as these coconut flour treats, but makes a gorgeous dough and it's awesome for roll-and-cut. You can find it at Smooth Roll-and-Cut Peanut Butter Dog Treats and lots of other adaptations for making treats with peanut butter on the blog.

      As all of the baked treats use some sort of flour, double-check that they're ok for your neighbour's diabetic doggy diet for sharing. If they have need to limit their starches, some of our other treat ideas, such as gummies or jerky, might fit the vet's guidelines. It's always great that you know exactly what's in a homemade treat, but all the moreso if allergies or special diets are in play. Woofs! :)

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  6. Can you substitute the coconut flour with oat flour?

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    1. Hi Grace,

      Oat flour isn't a direct substitute for coconut flour (coconut flour is very absorbent and binds differently), so you would need to make some significant adjustments to ingredients/quantities to get a nice workable dough consistency. But experimentation is fun and pretty easy to do!

      Oat flour is a closer substitution for rice flour, and there are lots of peanut butter treats with rice flour on the blog if you'd like to try one of those, including our go-to basic peanut butter treat recipe (can ball and flatten any rolling dough instead of making roll-and-cut treats, if you'd prefer.) Hope that helps! :)

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  7. what does 180C equal in Fahrenheit?

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    1. 180C is 356F (~350-360F on the dial).

      Also, temperatures in our treat recipes are "normal" conventional baking settings by default, not fan-forced / fan-baked.

      Hope that helps!

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